fredchartrand
 
Canadian Press photographer Fred Chartrand acknowledges a standing ovation as he is recognized in the House of Commons by Speaker Peter Milliken for 38 years of exemplary service covering Parliament Hill and eight prime ministers, following Question Period in Ottawa Friday Feb. 29, 2008.  THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tom Hanson

Fred Chartrand Photographer fredchartrand@gmail.com 613-796-0883

Fred Chartrand retired from the Canadian Press on February 28, 2008. Since February this national award-winning photographer/photo journalist has freelanced for national newspapers, magazines, news agencies and corporate clients. Fred has also acted as a visual consultant as well as undertaking several special projects including a tour to the Northwest Territories with the Governor-General and a personal photo-essay on cancer and community living in Ontario for the Photosensitive group.

For more than thirty-eight years Fred has dedicated his career to the capture storytelling, and reporting of international and national events. From elections in Nicaragua where he shot inside a rebel Contra camp to being one of the few journalists in Iran during the American hostage crisis and the aborted U.S rescue mission, Fred has earned his place in Canadian photo-journalism history. Covering the Gulf War, Olympic Games, G-8 Leaders Summits, Commonwealth Summits, Francophonie Summits, seven federal election campaigns and the terms of seven Prime Ministers, this national newspaper award-winning photographer has been a fixture on Parliament Hill, across the country and around the world as the senior photographer for the Canadian Press.

Grey Cups, Stanley Cups, national and international sporting events, Fred’s love of his career continues . “I will never truly retire until I’m six feet under,” says the well-respected photo-journalist known affectionately by his colleagues as “the legend.”

Fred wishes to continue to take pictures that capture the people and events that define both the everyday and the extraordinary moments . Whether a new slant on a corporate report, personal or professional portraits or the news photography on which he has built his four decade career, Fred is always interested in the visual history of our times.